Adventure, blogging, Books, Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Fiction, Mythology, Reading, Uncategorized

Tiger’s Destiny By Colleen Houck

“With three of the goddess Durga’s quests behind them, only one prophecy now stands in the way of Kelsey, Ren, and Kishan breaking the tiger’s curse. But the trio’s greatest challenge awaits them: A life-endangering pursuit in search of Durga’s final gift, the Rope of Fire, on the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal. It’s a race against time, and the evil sorcerer Lokesh, in this eagerly anticipated fourth volume in the bestselling Tiger’s Curse series, which pits good against evil, tests the bonds of love and loyalty, and finally reveals the tigers’ true destinies once and for all.”

 

The Finale, the end of the series, always so bitter sweet to finale know the conclusion to story you’ve ready. Kelsey now dating/engaged to Kishan yet knowing the love she had for him is not the Romantic kind, but that of a sibling. The one she truly loves being Ren (Of Course). Kishan is sure of Kelsey’s love for him just not of her decision to stay with him and not go back to Ren. Ren, now having his memories back wants Kelsey back and will not give up till he gets her back. They also have one last task to complete.

Kelsey still doubts that the boys like her even though she gets proposed to three times in this book alone. The worst part of the book is how jealous she gets over Ren yet staying with Kishan. Kishan gets angry about her caring for Ren, ,and Ren enjoys making Kishan angry, yet attempting to take a step back from Kelsey. the books line turns from what the other books have done the quest for the item is a short part of the book. They way it is done makes for a more intruding ending to the series.

Overall it was a good conclusion to a decent series. Many world myths are represented as operating together, and not one saying the other doesn’t exist or is superior than the other. They are woven together, in a way that makes sense for the story, kind of in a Percy Jackson way but also different. It was a good conclusion, but if you are not yet ready to let them go there is a novella and a book about Kishan. Houck did a good job tailoring the Indian myths into a story that is captivating, yet still hold some of the Cliché and troupe’s that are typically of YA novels.

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